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In plumbing, a trap is a device which has a shape that uses a bending path to capture water to prevent sewer gases from entering buildings. In refinery applications, traps are used to prevent hydrocarbons and other dangerous gases from escape. An S-shaped trap is also known as an S-bend. I The new U-bend could not jam, so, unlike the S-bend, it did not need an overflow. The most common of these traps in houses is referred to as a P-trap. It is the addition of a 90 degree fitting on the outlet side of a U-bend, thereby creating a P-like shape. It is also referred to as a sink trap because it is installed under most house sinks.
Because of its shape, the trap retains a small amount of water after the fixture’s use. This water in the trap creates a seal that prevents sewer gas from passing from the drain pipes back into the occupied space of the building. Essentially all plumbing fixtures including sinks, bathtubs, and toilets must be equipped with either an internal or external trap.

 

Because it is a localized low-point in the plumbing, sink traps also tend to capture heavy objects (such as jewellery) that are inadvertently dropped into the sink. Traps also tend to collect hair, sand, and other debris and limit the ultimate size of objects that will pass on into the rest of the plumbing, thereby catching oversized objects. For all of these reasons, most traps can either be disassembled for cleaning or they provide some sort of cleanout feature.
When a large volume of water may be discharged through the trap, a standpipe may be required to prevent impact to other nearby traps.

 

Plumbing is all about pipes and fittings. Pipes establish the runs that bring or take water, with fittings controlling and manipulating the flow. Pipes are simple enough: they’re straight, and come in different sizes. Pick the right material and length, and you’re pretty much good to go. Fittings – for a plumber – are much the same. But for the average homeowner, there are a lot of fittings. Some can be perplexing, others downright intimidating once materials and sizing are considered. The sizing we’ll explore in another article; for now, you can learn a little bit about the most common fittings found in your home’s plumbing. Never again will you need to ask for “the thingy with the two ends that connects the two pipes at an angle”!

Adapters are used to extend runs, or to simply change the connection type at the end of a pipe. This allows dissimilar pipes to be connected, without the need for a more involved setup.

 

Adapters are available in most all standard materials: ABS, brass, copper, CPVC, malleable (galvanized and black), PVC, and stainless steel.
Bushings are used to join pipes of different sizes, usually by reducing a larger fitting down to a smaller pipe. Bushings are usually – not always – threaded both inside and out, and take up very little space compared to a coupling or union, which accomplish the same goal.

 

Offered in: ABS, brass, chrome-plated brass, copper, CPVC, malleable (galvanized and black), PVC, and stainless steel.
Unions are an alternative to couplings, when the latter are impractical or inconvenient. Whereas couplings (when not soldered) need to have pipe threaded into them, unions rely upon their own nut to create a seal between the pipe ends. This makes them the perfect choice for connecting two fixed pipes (that are unable to be threaded into a regular coupling), and make future repairs that much easier. Dielectric unions are used to join pipes of different metals by providing a barrier against galvanic corrosion. For all their benefits, unions do have drawbacks: they are not to be used with natural and LP gas.
Now that  you know more about plumbing, order your desired equipment  at Direct Wholesale Supplies.

 

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